Featured Stories

Sportscasting vs Being a Homer

Being a homer is one of my sportscasting pet peeves. Sportscasters are story tellers first and foremost, so I always wonder how homer sportscasters can tell that story properly while being so slanted in one direction or another. Whether it’s the other team, your team or the refs, taking focus away from the game, the story, by being a homer can be a big negative when it comes to sportscasting.

The Salt Lake Tribune’s Scott Pierce has penned a great look at being a homer in sports, focusing on sportscasters who take things too far. He hones in on bickering about referee decisions, opponents or even fans.

Some fans want sportscasters to cheer for the home team. Those fans aren’t happy when it’s pointed out that, no, not every foul against their team is a bad call and, yes, sometimes the opponents play well. You run into these folks at every game. And they make noise on social media.

I was at a football game years ago when the visitors picked up an incomplete pass and ran it in for a TD. A guy in front of us bellowed at the refs; my friend and I remarked that it had been a backward pass — a lateral — and the right call; the guy then bellowed at us.

Ah, fans. You’ve got to love them. Or not. I personally want sportscasters to do their jobs. To tell us what’s actually happening.

Yes, a lot of it is opinion — whether it’s about how well a player is performing, a coach’s decisions or a ref’s calls.

But if you’re going to complain about every call made or missed, I’m going to tune you out. Which is why I have a tough time listening to more than one local radio station’s gamecasts.

Click here to read the full article.

Opt In Image
ACCESS SPORTSCASTER LIFE'S RESOURCE LIBRARY

Sign up for exclusive downloads, helpful tips and direct links to some of our best and most helpful content made by sportscasters, for sportscasters.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Top